FAQ

We’re Here for You

We want you to be in the know regarding our services and therapy treatments. Below you’ll find answers to our clients’ frequently asked questions. We cover quite a lot of topics, but if there is something we haven’t touched on, please don’t hesitate to ask.

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What is ABA anyway?

To summarize (because this can be a very short or very long response), "Behavior Analysis" is a behavioral science that researches the most effective ways to reduce or improve a variety of behaviors, such as aggression, communication, self-stimulatory behaviors, etc. "Applied Behavior Analysis" is taking these strongly research supported tools and strategies and applying them to everyday environments to help individuals improve upon their global functioning.

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Does ABA therapy work for Autism?

Yes.  However, every child is different, and some children might show more significant gains than others. Studies have shown that some children with autism receiving two or more years of intensive behavioral intervention have been virtually indistinguishable from their neurotypical peers.  There are hundreds of studies supporting the effectiveness of ABA therapy, and federal and state agencies, as well as insurance companies, cover this therapy.

How will ABA therapy help my child?

ABA therapy will address the developmental needs identified during an initial assessment of your child’s abilities across language, social and behavioral domains. An individualized teaching plan will be created to target any area of need, but common goals include learning to ask for help, learning to follow classroom instructions, and how to use language across a variety of settings.
Other important target areas of ABA include social skills, play skills, potty training, self-care skills (brushing teeth, washing hands, etc.), and day-to-day living skills (independently getting dressed, following safety instructions, etc.).

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Does ABA Therapy Mean My Child is “Stuck” at a Table All Day Repeating the Same Tasks?

No way! We strive to create an engaging environment for learning. While sitting at a table may be a developmental goal (especially if we’re aiming for school) there are so many other skills on which to focus. We use two ABA methods of “training,” Discrete Trail Training (DTT) and Natural Environment Training (NET). DTT is set in an individualized space, that involves therapist led floor play, table work, matching and more. NET is set in a large exciting play space where kiddos lead the way and therapists work alongside them on appropriate play, name recognition, sharing, motor skills and more.  Not only that, but our centers involve ‘Eats and Craft’ spaces that are used daily. Circle Time is also a daily activity based on age and/or communication levels where therapists, BCBAs and kiddos alike can be caught singing, laughing, and learning together. Each center also has the autonomy to introduce fun therapist lead activities like group exercise or stimulus rooms. There is a wide variety of techniques and methods used in ABA.

How are Parents Involved?

Families and guardians are an essential part of any ABA therapy program and need to be active in the treatment process. Family Guidance is a core part of what we do at ABC. We require biweekly sessions between guardians and their dedicated BCBA in which there are continued discussions and teachings on how to generalize what’s being done during center hours to their lives at home and in the community.

Does my child have to have a formal autism diagnosis to get treatment?

Children are not required to have a diagnosis for treatment but children are required to have a formal diagnosis in order to receive coverage from insurance providers.  Insurance coverage is required for treatment.

What is ABA anyway?

To summarize (because this can be a very short or very long response), "Behavior Analysis" is a behavioral science that researches the most effective ways to reduce or improve a variety of behaviors, such as aggression, communication, self-stimulatory behaviors, etc. "Applied Behavior Analysis" is taking these strongly research supported tools and strategies and applying them to everyday environments to help individuals improve upon their global functioning.

There is huge variability in this field when it comes to fees. Many factors effect rates such as location, number of hours per week, size of ABA team, is the program supervised by a BCBA, etc.  On average, the rate for an ABA therapist is $XX per hour. Average rate for a BCBA is $XX per hour.  The average number of therapy hours needed each week would be between 25-30. Besides private pay, most get reimbursement through their insurance companies to pay for ABA therapy.

There is huge variability in this field when it comes to fees. Many factors effect rates such as location, number of hours per week, size of ABA team, is the program supervised by a BCBA, etc.  On average, the rate for an ABA therapist is $XX per hour. Average rate for a BCBA is $XX per hour.  The average number of therapy hours needed each week would be between 25-30. Besides private pay, most get reimbursement through their insurance companies to pay for ABA therapy.

The short answer is: Probably. ABA is a behavioral method, so anything that is a behavior can potentially be modified by ABA. This includes language, tying shoes, using the toilet, hugging a sister, doing homework, walking the family dog, kicking the cat, cursing, wandering away from the house, etc. If its a behavior then ABA can be used to teach/improve/or reduce it.

What insurances do you accept?

We accept the following insurances :

Many major commercial insurances now cover ABA for clients with an autism diagnosis. Feel free to call our office with your insurance information and our knowledgeable staff will look into it for you. What do the initial steps of the process entail? Once we have ensured your child’s benefits, an assessment will then be scheduled with one of our team’s experienced behavior analysts (BCBA). Your BCBA will then create a treatment plan uniquely tailored to the needs of your child.

Most children with autism require some support as they age, even into adulthood. However, many children who complete ABA therapy can enter a regular classroom setting with support services rather than a special education program. The most severely disabled children may continue to benefit from a one-on-one approach.

Of Course!  See below:


ABA - Applied Behaviour Analysis is the application of strategic science-based operational techniques based on the principles of behaviour.

ABA Therapist - The ABA therapist is a frontline worker who applies the principles of ABA under the guidance of a professionally trained BCBA.

ABC's of Behaviour - Antecedent, Behaviour, Consequence.

Antecedent - What happened before a behaviour.

Autism Spectrum Disorders - Disorders which involve a range of deficits that occur along a spectrum.

Behaviour – Observable actions made by an individual.

Chaining – Breaking tasks down into steps.

Consequence – The result of an action.

Deprivation – Being without something considered essential.

Developmentally Delayed – A condition where the person does not reach typical milestones of development.

Discrete Trial Training (DTT) – A highly structured one-on-one teaching method which breaks down skills and teaches them in small increments.

Discriminative stimulus (SD) – A stimulus, (prompt) that increases the probability of a response.

Echoic – A type of behaviour which involves repeating the same sound or word after it is heard.

Echolalia – A type of behaviour which involves repeating sounds, phrases or words at any given time from memory.

Extinction – The elimination of reinforcement for a behaviour.

Extinction burst – Shortly after the removal of a reinforcer the behaviour gets worse before it gets better.

FBA (Functional Behaviour Analysis) – An assessment done that identifies a specific behaviour, identifying the factors that support the behaviour and determine the purpose of why the behaviour is happening.

Fine Motor Skills – Skills which involve the use of small muscle groups, (writing, scissors, etc.).

Generalization – The ability to use new skills across different environments.

Gross Motor Skills – Skills which involved large muscle groups, (standing, walking, etc.).

Intraverbal – A response which is based on verbal input, (eg. responding to a question).

Mand – When a person verbally asks for something.

NET – NET stands for Natural Environment Teaching, where ABA is applied within the natural environment of the learner, (eg. while they’re playing with toys).

Pairing – A term used for building rapport with a client. This term refers to associating yourself with the individual’s favourite items to improve your value from their perspective

PECS – PECS or Picture Exchange Communication System, is an alternative method of communication that uses pictures with words underneath.

Probe – An assessment to measure the level of a specific skill. This is usually used at the beginning of therapy or when a new skill is introduced in order to gauge previous knowledge.

Prompt – A prompt is an instruction that is given before a behaviour. It can take on different forms: visual (pictures), verbal(voice), gestural (pointing), modelling (showing them) and physical (physically guiding them).

Prompt Dependent – Prompt dependency can happen when an individual awaits instructions instead of initiating in a task.

Punishment – A consequence that aims to reduce behaviour.

RBT - Registered Behaviour Technician.

Reinforcement – Something that follows a behaviour that increases the likelihood of it occurring again.

Satiation – The reduction in satisfaction with an item or need, (when a child gets bored with a certain toy).

Scrolling – Multiple responses are given based on effectiveness in the past. Individuals will list or, “scroll” answers they previously gave in hopes that one is correct.

Self injurious behaviour (SIB) – Any behaviour that results in physical harm to themselves.

Shaping – A teaching method that involves rewarding an individual throughout a step-by-step process in obtaining a target behaviour.

Spontaneous Recovery – The re-emergence of a particular behaviour that was thought to be eliminated.

Stimulus - A stimulus is something that causes a reaction or response. It can be anything that we hear, smell, see, touch or taste.

Tact – A verbal behaviour when the individual labels something.

Target Behaviour – The behaviour identified, (by the FBA) that needs to change.

Task Analysis – The process of breaking down complex tasks into small, simple steps.

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